Thursday, April 12, 2018

Printable Handspun Yarn labels


I'm really not the most organised of people, but every so often I'll pull myself together, drag myself out from under the pile of chaos that's building up around me and sort myself out.

I love hand spinning and knitting, but the problem is, I enjoy the former quite a lot more than the latter.  Consequently, I have a pile of handspun yarn that I've spun purely for the pleasure and relaxation I get from spinning, with no real end purpose in sight.

I came to the conclusion that I'd be much more likely to use my yarn if I knew exactly what I had in the first place.  

I decided to design some handspun yarn labels, so that I know how much is in each skein and what gauge of yarn it is.  If I've dyed or blended it myself, I can also add which colours or dyes I used so that I can try to replicate it in future.  Now for me, that's organised!


This is just a small selection of my handspun yarn that I've managed to measure, weigh and label so far. At least now I can search for a pattern on Ravelry, knowing exactly the gauge and length of yarn I have in each skein.  I can see several cowls, gloves and shawls-worth right there!



Here's a png of my handspun yarn labels if you'd like to print your own, or I've created a PDF link here



They're designed to fit on A4 card, but I'm sure with a little resizing they'll work well on US letter card too.  All you need to do is cut them out and punch a hole to attach them to your skein. 


I've printed mine onto cream linen cardstock, but they'd also look beautiful on hammered card or watercolour paper.


If you're feeling really organised, make sure that the loop you attach the label to your skein is long enough so that you can reattach the label to the outer yarn of your centre-pull ball.  That way it doesn't unravel from the outside; if you have any left over, you'll be able to work out exactly how much from the weight.

I hope you find my labels useful!  Happy spinning!

Copyright - I'm sharing these labels purely for personal use.  Please do not use them for commercial use.  Feel free to share them with your friends, but please give them the link to this page.

---------- 

Please be sweet and share the love. Leave a comment, like my Facebook page for regular updates or follow me on Pinterest.
Follow me on PinterestLike me on FacebookFollow me on TwitterContact me

Monday, December 18, 2017

Mini Hama Bead Wreath Christmas card




A few days ago I blogged about the Hama bead Christmas wreath that I designed.  It's gracing our tree as I type.


Do please have a look at it here, I go into quite a bit more detail about using Hama beads than in this post.

I couldn't help but wonder how the wreath would look made out of mini Hama beads.


I've made a couple of projects out of mini Hama beads - a Christmas pudding card and a portrait. I love the definition they give to a design - they are also incredibly cute!  Every Christmas I like to send a few handmade cards to people close to me that appreciate all things handmade and I knew that this wreath would look even better in miniature.

Now, if you've never seen mini Hama beads, I should warn you that they are tiny - I mean really small!  Standard midi Hama beads are 5mm in diameter, while mini Hama beads are just 2mm wide.


Here they are next to each other as a comparison.  The hexagon pegboards above have the same number of pegs on them, but the mini Hama bead hexagon pegboard will sit comfortably in an adult's hand.  I should probably point out that the recommended age for mini Hama beads is 10+.  I fear that my 9 year old wouldn't have the dexterity and co-ordination to handle them without getting extremely frustrated!  I personally like to pick up and place my mini Hama beads with tweezers as I find that it gives me a little more control.  I find it also helps to sit under a bright light - my eyesight is not what it used to be!


I didn't actually have a mini hexagon pegboard and so the cheapest way of getting one delivered to me was to buy this mixed set for making owls that came with Hama beads, ironing paper and a mini hexagon pegboard.


When I'm using Mini Hama beads I like to store them in these stacking bead boxes, which thankfully have a lid for each colour.


Another useful tip I've discovered is that dropping pinches of each colour onto a large mini Hama beadboard creates almost a small palette for you to easily tweeze your colours from.  It prevents them from rolling away, but still helps to keep each colour close at hand.




Here's a printable pattern of the original Hama bead wreath.  I didn't have dark red or gold in mini Hama beads, so I substituted them with burgundy and mustard (or Winnie the Pooh brown), but any complementary colours would work.


Here's the un-ironed wreath on the pegboard.  Once I'd got my work area set up and I picked up speed, one of these little wreaths took me about three-quarters of an hour.


Here's the back of the wreath when I'd run an iron over it.  I should probably say that mini Hama beads are a little more difficult to iron as they are so small and light.  You need to be very confident and firm with your iron and run it over the whole design for at least 10 seconds before you attempt to lift off your iron to have a look - this I have learned from experience!


To make the card I printed Merry Christmas onto some 9cm x 11cm cards.  The font is Lainie Day SH if you wanted to print and make your own.


To assemble the cards I simply stuck the Hama bead wreath on with extra strong double sided sticky tape.  I did make some little bows to stick underneath, but they just looked too fussy.  The bows would have also made the cards too thick for a second class stamp, so that certainly helped with my decision!


I managed to make 4 cards in this colourway.

Out of curiosity, and in the name of frugality, I thought it might be interesting to see how a wreath would look in the mini Hama beads that came with the owl Hama bead set I purchased with the mini hexagon Hama beadboard.


I love it just as much as the traditional Christmas wreath!  The colours are a lot more spring-like, so I turned it into a birthday card instead.


Here are the mini and midi wreaths side by side, just to illustrate again how small and delicate the mini Hama beads are.

I'm so pleased with how my mini Christmas wreath turned out.  It reminds me a little of a vintage cross-stitch sampler.  Maybe I'll find a little square frame to put one in for next year...

Copyright - I have provided the free pattern for personal use.  Make them for yourself or give them as gifts, sell them to raise funds for charity but please do not sell them for profit.  
If you post images of your own versions on the internet, please link back to this page. 
Thank you.


This blog post contains Amazon affiliate links to similar products that I purchased to make the Hama bead Christmas wreath.  If you click through and purchase, I will receive a very small percentage of the purchase price.
---------- 

Please be sweet and share the love. Leave a comment, like my Facebook page for regular updates or follow me on Pinterest.
Follow me on PinterestLike me on FacebookFollow me on TwitterContact me